• Helpline
    +91-9811 01 9040
    +91-8448 80 9838

ACTIVATED CARBON FILTERS

Enquiry Form

Carbon filtering is a method of filtering that uses a bed of activated carbon to remove contaminants and impurities, using chemical adsorption.

Each particle, or granule, of carbon provides a large surface area, or pore structure, allowing contaminants the maximum possible exposure to the active sites within the filter media. One gram of activated carbon has a surface area in excess of 3,000 m2 (32,000 sq ft). The rate of adsorption for a surface area of a just one pound of AC is equal to 60-150 acres.

Activated carbon works via a process called adsorption, whereby pollutant molecules in the fluid to be treated are trapped inside the pore structure of the carbon substrate. Carbon filtering is commonly used for water purification, air filtering and industrial gas processing, for example the removal of siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide from biogas. It is also used in a number of other applications, including respirator masks, the purification of sugarcane and in the recovery of precious metals, especially gold. It is also used in cigarette filters.

Active charcoal carbon filters are most effective at removing chlorine, particles such as sediment, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), taste and odor from water. They are not effective at removing minerals, salts, and dissolved inorganic substances.

ACTIVATED CARBON FILTERS

Carbon filtering is a method of filtering that uses a bed of activated carbon to remove contaminants and impurities, using chemical adsorption.

Each particle, or granule, of carbon provides a large surface area, or pore structure, allowing contaminants the maximum possible exposure to the active sites within the filter media. One gram of activated carbon has a surface area in excess of 3,000 m2 (32,000 sq ft). The rate of adsorption for a surface area of a just one pound of AC is equal to 60-150 acres.

Activated carbon works via a process called adsorption, whereby pollutant molecules in the fluid to be treated are trapped inside the pore structure of the carbon substrate. Carbon filtering is commonly used for water purification, air filtering and industrial gas processing, for example the removal of siloxanes and hydrogen sulfide from biogas. It is also used in a number of other applications, including respirator masks, the purification of sugarcane and in the recovery of precious metals, especially gold. It is also used in cigarette filters.

Active charcoal carbon filters are most effective at removing chlorine, particles such as sediment, volatile organic compounds (VOCs), taste and odor from water. They are not effective at removing minerals, salts, and dissolved inorganic substances.



IGH-TECH FILTRATION


 

Powdered Activated Carbon ( PAC )

The methods used to create the various AC materials are highly proprietary and lead to distinct differences across the range of media available to the industry. Mark Controls specialists can specify high-tech filtration methods for the identified contaminates and the level of purity required. This is why it is critical to match up the correct activated carbon bed with the particular need. This will achieve the most efficient filtering and the longest use interval for the equipment.

Coconut shells and coal (anthracite or bituminous) are both organic sources of activated carbon. Carbon forms when an organic source is burned in an environment without oxygen. This process leaves only about 30% of the organic mass intact, driving off heavy organic molecules. Prior to being used for water treatment, the organic mass must then be "activated." The process of activation opens up the carbon's massive number of pores and further drives off unwanted molecules. The open pores are what allow the carbon to capture contaminants, known as "adsorption".

Activated carbon water treatment is basically used for two water treatment purposes and each work in totally different ways.

1. Chlorine Removal: Activated carbon may be used to remove chlorine with little degradation or damage to the carbon. Dechlorination occurs rapidly and flow rates are typically high. However, this process requires an extensive amount of surface area, and organics in the water will eventually fill up and block the pores of the carbon. Ultimately, the activated carbon filter will need to be replaced as its ability to dechlorinate the water will slowly decline. Spent carbon can be re-activated; however, re-activated filters should only be used in waste-water treatment applications. One advantage to using AC is its low operating cost and virtual "fail safe" operation once installed. One disadvantage is that as the chlorine is removed from the topmost layer of the media, the AC provides a damp environment ideal for the growth and proliferation of bacteria. Bacteria can cause problems in medical applications, or when using carbon as a pretreatment to reverse osmosis.

2. Removal of Organic Matter: As water passes through an activated carbon filter, organic particles and chemicals are trapped inside through a process known "adsorption".

The adsorption process depends upon 5 key factors:

1) physical properties of the activated carbon (surface area and pore size distribution);

2) the chemical makeup of the carbon source (amount of hydrogen and oxygen);

3) the chemical makeup and concentration of the contaminant

4) water pH and temperature; and

5) the length of time the water is exposed to the activated carbon filter (called empty bed contact time or EBCT).

Adsorption Process of Activated Carbon

Activated Carbon Filter - Design and Installation

Mark Controls are engaged in design,manufacture and installation of Activated Carbon Filters (ACF) for Commercial and Industrial usage. A wide variety of models are available which are specially configured to meet specefic requirements of the client. Based on requirements , the correct type of Activated Carbon Filter or Pressurised Carbon Filters (PCF) as they are also called, are selected keeping in view the required flow rate.